How do you say don’t judge a book by its cover in French?

What is it called to not judge a book by its cover?

The English idiom “don’t judge a book by its cover” is a metaphorical phrase that means one should not judge the worth or value of something by its outward appearance alone. For example, “That man may look very small and insignificant, but don’t judge a book by its cover – he’s a very powerful man in his circle“.

How do you say book cover in French?

book cover

  1. couverture, la ~ (f) Noun.
  2. couvre-livre, le ~ (m) Noun.
  3. jaquette, la ~ (f) Noun.
  4. enveloppe, la ~ (f) Noun.
  5. protège-livre, le ~ (m) Noun.

Who said the words don’t judge a book by its cover?

But it seems one mustn’t judge by th’ outside. This is a puzzlin’ world.” As you can see, it’s not the phrase exactly, although the sentiment is very much the same. Despite this, George Eliot is often attributed as saying don’t judge a book by its cover.

Where did the phrase don’t judge a book by its cover come from?

The phrase is attributed to a 1944 edition of the African journal American Speech: “You can’t judge a book by its binding.” It was popularized even more when it appeared in the 1946 murder mystery Murder in the Glass Room by Lester Fuller and Edwin Rolfe: “You can never tell a book by its cover.”

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Do not judge a book by its cover Hindi meaning?

कवर द्वारा एक किताब को जुज न करें

What’s the meaning of don’t judge a book by its cover in Telugu?

దాని కవర్ల ద్వారా ఒక పుస్తకాన్ని నిర్ధారించకండి

Can you judge a book by its cover?

These sayings are idioms. They mean you shouldn’t judge the value or worth of something based solely upon outward appearances. … So the old saying does hold true many times: You can’t necessarily judge a book by its cover. If you see a book whose cover intrigues you, give it a closer look.

Can don’t judge a book by its cover be a theme?

“Don’t trust a book by its cover” is a common idiom that means people should not prejudge individuals based on appearance alone. Thematically, there are several examples of this idiom throughout the novel Seedfolks by Paul Fleischman.