What are common French surnames?

What are the most common French surnames?

Most Common Last Names In France

Rank Surname Incidence
1 Martin 314,502
2 Bernard 169,361
3 Robert 140,774
4 Richard 138,260

What is a typical French surname?

The most common French last names for people born between 1891 and 1990 were: Martin (patronymic; after the most popular French saint, Saint Martin of Tours) Bernard (patronymic; from the given name, which is of Germanic origin) Thomas (patronymic; from the medieval given name of Biblical origin, meaning twin)

How do last names work in France?

Based on a parent’s name, patronyms and matronyms are the most common method by which French last names were constructed. Patronymic surnames are based on the father’s name and matronymic surnames on the mother’s name. The mother’s name was usually used only when the father’s name was unknown.

What are some uncommon French last names?

Unique Baby French Last Names (2021)

  • Allard – (noble)Beauregard (beautiful outlook) Acord – Variant of Achard. …
  • Bardon – Minstrel or singer-poet. Beausoleil – Beautiful sun, a sunny place. …
  • Cartier – Transporter of goods. …
  • Dubois – By the woods or forest. …
  • Eric – Sole ruler. …
  • Fafard – Kind. …
  • Genet – Eden. …
  • Halle – Home ruler.
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What are pretty French last names?

Here are our favorite French last names that make us wish for such an elegant-sounding moniker.

  • Allaire. Allaire is a surname used for people from the town of the same name. …
  • André André is a French form of Andrew and means masculine. …
  • Archambault. …
  • Arnaud. …
  • Arquette. …
  • Aubert. …
  • Augustin. …
  • Babin.

Is Rose a French surname?

The surname Rose comes from the name of the flower (rosa in Latin) and has English, Scottish, French and German roots. It could be a topographic name for someone who lived in a place where wild roses grew; or it could be a nickname for someone with a “rosy” complexion.

Is Agreste a French last name?

Adrien Agreste: The word “agreste” is French for “rustic”. Alya Césaire: Alya means “scarlet” in Slavonic while Césaire is a French variation of Caesarius, derived from Caesar, believed to mean “hair” or “hairy” in Roman, therefore her name means “scarlet hair” which Alya has.

What is the most common French name?

Most Popular First Names In France

Rank Gender Forename
1 100% Jean
2 99% Marie
3 100% Michel
4 61% Claude

Is Leblanc a French name?

French: variant of Blanc 1 (‘white’, ‘blond’, ‘pale’), with the definite article le.

What nationality is the surname French?

French is a locational name for someone who originated from France. Variants of the name include Frenche and Frenchman. This name is of Anglo-Norman descent spreading to Ireland, Scotland and Wales in early times and is found in many mediaeval manuscripts in these countries.

Do the French have middle names?

Many French also have a ‘middle name’ (un deuxième prénom), which is a secondary personal name written between the person’s first name and their family name. For example, Marie Monique DUBOIS’s middle name is ‘Monique’. It is common for French people to have multiple middle names, typically two to three.

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What’s a good French name?

Here are some of the most beautiful French names, what they mean, their origins, and how to pronounce them.

  • Aimée. Female | The French form for Amy, meaning ‘beloved’ | pronounced e-me. …
  • Anaïs. …
  • Corentin. …
  • Delphine. …
  • Étienne. …
  • Fleur. …
  • Gaël. …
  • Lucien.

What are fancy last names?

Fancy Last names – The Best Collection (2021)

  • Andilet – messenger. Alinac – light. …
  • Bancroft – Posh. Bandini – Cool. …
  • Carmichael – kind. Cobain – A rock star. …
  • Dalton – With a Life Path. Duke – leader. …
  • Elffire – foolish flame. …
  • Featherswallow – trader thought to resemble the bird. …
  • Granger – granary. …
  • Halifax – cool.

Is Dupont a French name?

French: topographic name for someone ‘from the bridge’, French pont (see Pont), with fused preposition and definite article du ‘from the’.