What’s so special about France?

Why is France so famous?

France entices people of all ages with some of the world’s most iconic landmarks, world-class art and architecture, sensational food, stunning beaches, glitzy ski resorts, beautiful countryside and a staggering amount of history.”

Is France known for love?

For a long time, France has been renowned as one of the most romantic countries in the world, with Paris often being referred to as the ‘city of love’. … Unsurprisingly, Paris is where countless couples flock for a short break or choose to declare their love for this city by purchasing a permanent home.

Why was it illegal to eat potatoes in France?

However, French people did not trust the new food, which was used mainly for feeding pigs, and in 1748 growing potatoes was banned by parliament as they were thought to spread disease, especially leprosy. … He suggested potatoes as an alternative to grain in time of famine saying they could be used like flour for baking.

What did France invent?

Optical Telegraph by Claude Chappe in 1792. Modern pencil by Nicolas-Jacques Conté in 1795. Paper machine by Louis-Nicolas Robert in 1799. Braille in 1825 by Louis Braille, a blind Frenchman: first digital form of writing.

Why France is the best country?

One of the reasons France keeps winning the ranking is its world-class health care system, which Dupouy just experienced first-hand. … “Its (France’s) tiresome bureaucracy and high taxes are outweighed by an unsurpassable quality of life, including the world’s best health care.”

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Is ketchup banned in France?

In an effort to promote healthful eating and, it has been suggested, to protect traditional Gallic cuisine, the French government has banned school and college cafeterias nationwide from offering the American tomato-based condiment with any food but — of all things — French fries. …

Is it illegal to throw out food in France?

In February 2016, France adopted a law on fighting food waste that meant supermarkets were forbidden to destroy unsold food products and were compelled to donate it instead. This law constituted the starting point of the fight against food waste through banning its destruction and facilitating donation.