Why did the US back France in Vietnam?

Why did the US support France instead of Vietnam after ww2?

During World War II (1939–1945), Japan stationed a large number of soldiers in Vietnam and reduced French influence. … The U.S., which initially favored Vietnamese independence, came to support France due to Cold War politics and American fears that an independent Vietnam would be dominated by communists.

Why did the US support France in the First Indochina War?

The Indochina War was largely funded and partly supplied by the U.S. in exchange for French support for the American-desired NATO. The French and Americans sought to carve out the southern region of Vietnam and turn it into “South Vietnam” in a nation-building experiment.

Why did the Vietnamese want independence?

The Vietnamese rejected French rule for pretty much the same reason that the American colonies rejected British rule. The reason for that is that the Vietnamese wanted to be free and independent just like people from just about every country want to be.

What convinced the French to pull out of Vietnam?

2) What convinced the French to pull out of Vietnam? The French troops were unable to defeat the Vietminh guerrillas, and casualties made the war increasingly unpopular with the French people. When the French lost Dien Bien Phu to the Vietminh, they decided to make peace and withdraw from Indochina.

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Why did France invade Vietnam?

The decision to invade Vietnam was made by Napoleon III in July 1857. It was the result not only of missionary propaganda but also, after 1850, of the upsurge of French capitalism, which generated the need for overseas markets and the desire for a larger French share of the Asian territories conquered by the West.

What did France do to Vietnam?

Beginning in the 1930s, France began to exploit the region for its natural resources and to economically diversify the colony. Cochinchina, Annam and Tonkin (encompassing modern-day Vietnam) became a source of tea, rice, coffee, pepper, coal, zinc and tin, while Cambodia became a centre for rice and pepper crops.