You asked: What led to the Treaty of Alliance with France?

What led to an alliance with France?

Formalized in the 1778 Treaty of Alliance, it was a military pact in which the French provided many supplies for the Americans. … The French alliance was possible once the Americans captured a British invasion army at Saratoga in October 1777, demonstrating the viability of the American cause.

Why did the British form an alliance with France?

A motivating factor behind the agreement was undoubtedly France’s desire to protect itself against possible aggression from its old rival, Germany, who had steadily been growing stronger in the years since its victory in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71 and now possessed the most powerful land army in the world.

Why was the Treaty of Alliance created?

The Treaty of Alliance was in effect an insurance policy for France, which guaranteed the support of the United States if Britain broke the peace that it had with the French “either by direct hostilities, or by (hindering) her commerce and navigation,” as a result of the signing of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce.

Why did France ally with the colonies?

European nations had a number of reasons why they aided the American colonies against Britain. … Common Enemy – Britain had become the major power in Europe and the rest of the world. Countries such as France and Spain saw Britain as their enemy. By aiding the Americans they were also hurting their enemy.

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What is the French Treaty?

The Treaty of Paris of 1763 ended the French and Indian War/Seven Years’ War between Great Britain and France, as well as their respective allies. In the terms of the treaty, France gave up all its territories in mainland North America, effectively ending any foreign military threat to the British colonies there.

Why did France enter into this alliance with the newly declared independence United States?

The eagerness of the French to help the United States was motivated both by an appreciation of the American revolutionaries’ democratic ideals and by bitterness at having lost most of their American empire to the British at the conclusion of the French and Indian Wars in 1763.